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Clear it, but will they come? Native plants need re-seeding after rhododendron removal, study finds

Added: 23.08.2017 21:27 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Native plants need a helping hand if they are to recover from invasive rhododendron, Scottish ecologists have discovered. A new study in the reveals that – even at sites cleared of rhododendron 30 years ago – much native flora has still not returned. As a result, rhododendron eradication programs may need to be supplemented by reseeding for the original plant community to re-establish.

Tags: Planes
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

How cells hack their own genes

Added: 23.08.2017 21:27 | 0 views | 0 comments

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DNA in all organisms from yeast to humans encodes the genes that make it possible to live and reproduce. But these beneficial genes make up only 2% of our DNA. Now researchers have unveiled a novel mechanism for gene expression.

Tags: Genes, DNA, Cher
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

The science of fluoride flipping

Added: 23.08.2017 21:27 | 0 views | 0 comments

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So much of what happens inside cells to preserve health or cause disease is so small or time-sensitive that researchers are just now getting glimpses of the complexities unfolding in us every minute of the day. Now researchers have discovered one such complexity -- a previously hidden mode of RNA regulation vital for bacterial defense against toxic fluoride ions. The discovery opens a new research avenue for developing drugs that target RNA.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

What causes algal blooms to become toxic?

Added: 23.08.2017 18:44 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Domoic acid is a potent neurotoxin produced by marine algae and discovered in 1987 as the cause of amnesic shellfish poisoning. Scientists have made substantial progress in understanding and predicting the conditions that lead to large blooms of the toxin-producing algae (diatoms called Pseudo-nitzschia). But one aspect of these toxic algal blooms, which affect wildlife as well as economically important fisheries, remains a mystery: how do the algae make domoic acid and what triggers its production?

Tags: EU, Scientists
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Understanding how omega-3 dampens inflammatory reactions

Added: 23.08.2017 17:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Omega-3 fatty acids, which we primarily get through eating fatty fish, have long been thought to be good for our health. Many dietary studies have suggested that high intake is associated with a reduced risk of various disorders. Clinical trials have also shown beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in patients taking omega-3 supplements.

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Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

New microbe has potential to help rebalance Earth's nitrogen cycle

Added: 23.08.2017 17:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Microbiologists have now provided unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Dolphin that existed along South Carolina coast long ago

Added: 23.08.2017 17:28 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Researchers have discovered a species of extinct dolphin off the coast of South Carolina.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Disease-carrying mosquitoes rare in undisturbed tropical forests

Added: 23.08.2017 14:53 | 0 views | 0 comments

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A new study concludes that conserving old-growth tropical rainforest is 'highly recommended' to prevent new outbreaks of viral and parasitic mosquito-borne diseases.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

What's the annual value of trees? $500 million per megacity, study says

Added: 23.08.2017 14:29 | 0 views | 0 comments

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In the megacities that are home to nearly 10 percent of the world's 7.5 billion people, trees provide each city with more than $500 million each year in services that make urban environments cleaner, more affordable and more pleasant places to live.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

The toes tell the tale

Added: 23.08.2017 14:29 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Though modern horses now have a single toe, their earliest ancestors had three on their front legs, and four on the back. Scientists are shedding new light on what drove those changes, and in a new study show that the dual pressures of increasing body weight and shrinking side toes prompted early horses' middle toes to become dramatically stronger and better able to resist forces.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

How muscles work: New insight

Added: 23.08.2017 12:41 | 0 views | 0 comments


Muscle malfunctions may be as simple as a slight strain after exercise or as serious as heart failure and muscular dystrophy. A new technique now makes it possible to look much more closely at how sarcomeres, the basic building blocks within all skeletal and cardiac muscles, work together. It's a discovery that should advance research into a wide range of muscle malfunctions.

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Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Understanding Caribbean mammal extinctions of the past spurs renewed focus on conservation

Added: 23.08.2017 12:14 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Paleontologists report they have clear evidence that the arrival of humans and subsequent human activity throughout the islands of the Caribbean were likely the primary causes of the extinction of native mammal species there. The evidence, they say, highlights the need for urgent human intervention to protect the native mammal species still inhabiting the region.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Climate change is luring Kodiak bears away from their iconic salmon streams

Added: 23.08.2017 12:13 | 1 views | 0 comments

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Kodiak brown bears are abandoning salmon -- their iconic prey -- due to climate change, according to a new study.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

How fish recognize toxic prey

Added: 23.08.2017 9:41 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Predator animals have long been known to avoid devouring brightly colored and patterned prey, and now an international study has revealed more about how they recognize toxic species. Researchers examined sea slugs, or nudibranchs, which had bright color patterns to warn predators they contained toxic defenses.

Tags: Animals, Cher
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

New insights into the world of trypanosomes

Added: 23.08.2017 9:41 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Such detailed images of the pathogen that causes sleeping sickness inside a host are unique so far: They illustrate the manifold ways in which the parasites move inside a tsetse fly.

Tags: Sleep
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Treating arthritis with algae

Added: 23.08.2017 9:41 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Researchers are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. When chemically modified, this 'alginate' reduces oxidative stress, has an anti-inflammatory effect in cell culture tests and suppresses the immune reaction against cartilage cells, thereby combating the causes of arthritis. The research is, however, still in its infancy.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Lego proteins revealed

Added: 23.08.2017 9:40 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Lego-like assemblies should have formed relatively frequently during evolution, suggest researchers. Could this assembly method be common, or even easy to reproduce? Their answer may have implications for both biological research and nanoscience.

Tags: LEGO, Cher
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Genetic map reveals heat tolerance traits in peas

Added: 23.08.2017 9:10 | 0 views | 0 comments


As the global climate changes and temperatures continue to rise, heat stress is becoming a major limiting factor for pea cultivation. A new study indicates that pea plants with some specific traits -- such as longer flowering time and higher pod numbers -- may be more resistant to heat stress. The researchers also gained new insights into the genetics of heat tolerance in pea.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Sub-tropical corals vulnerable, new study shows

Added: 23.08.2017 9:09 | 2 views | 0 comments

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The vulnerability and conservation value of sub-tropical reefs south of the Great Barrier Reef -- regarded as climate change refuges -- has been highlighted in a new study. The study of Eastern Australian reefs revealed coral species would likely shift their distribution southward in response to climate change.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

More than 99 percent of the microbes inside us are unknown to science

Added: 23.08.2017 9:09 | 0 views | 0 comments

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A survey of DNA fragments circulating in the blood suggests the microbes living within us are vastly more diverse than previously known. In fact, 99 percent of that DNA has never been seen before.

Tags: GM, DNA
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

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